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Eyes to the World . . .

Hong Kong Days
Hong Kong Days
Hong Kong Days

One of the challenges of living in the paradise of a summer in Montauk is that it’s easy to forget the world. For a few particular reasons, however, I cannot turn my eyes away.

Way back in the early ‘90s I went on what would be the first of many trips to Hong Kong - trips that would eventually lead to a one-year residency there living in the area called Happy Valley. On that very first venture, however, while wandering about the City I happened upon a Pro-Democracy rally. Over my time there, I saw many. Each time I encountered these demonstrations my respect levels grew. I have always known Hong Kong as an incredibly prosperous, thriving, and industrious megalopolis. Yet there is a very strong sense of civic engagement and responsibility to organize and express political views. The anniversaries of the Tiananmen Massacre in Hong Kong ALWAYS drew crowds in Victoria Park — if you like numbers, the reports say upwards of 100,000 for each of the past ten years. And they are willing to fight for their rights.

So, I am not surprised at what’s happening there. Appreciating that Hong Kongers are much more intimately aware of the goings on in Beijing in 1989 and the brutal and horrendous outcome, one must appreciate the great amount of courage to be staging the demonstrations there now. An HK-born friend of mine there regularly sends me videos and photos from the local news outlets. It is not a pretty picture. OnOne of the challenges of living in the paradise of a summer in Montauk is that it’s easy to forget the world. For a few particular reasons, however, I cannot turn my eyes away.

Way back in the early ‘90s I went on what would be the first of many trips to Hong Kong - trips that would eventually lead to a one-year residency. On that very first venture, however, while wandering about the City I happened upon a peaceful march of hundreds of people in what I had to be told was a Pro-Democracy rally. I had no clue what was going on. Over my time there, however, I saw many. Each time I encountered these demonstrations my respect levels grew. I have always known Hong Kong as an incredibly prosperous, thriving, and industrious megalopolis. Yet there is a very strong sense of civic engagement and responsibility to organize for expressing political views that would shame most Americans. The anniversaries of the Tiananmen Massacre in Hong Kong ALWAYS drew crowds in Victoria Park — if you like numbers, the reports say upwards of 100,000 for each of the past ten years. The park would be filled body-to-body — peacefully. Yet, don’t be fooled: they are willing to fight for their rights.

So, I am not surprised at what’s happening there. Appreciating that Hong Kongers are much more intimately aware of the the brutal and horrendous outcome in Beijing in 1989 , one must appreciate the great amount of courage to be staging the demonstrations there now. An HK-born friend of mine there regularly sends me videos and photos from the local news outlets. It is not a pretty picture. One thing I can see in the videos though, is that while these demonstrators have the most peaceful of intentions, they are not about to stand there, be mowed down & “disappeared.” They are incredibly aware, strategic, organized and they are not easily intimidated. They are very prepared to fight back, and are. Also, Hong Kong is to Beijing like night is to day. There are not the broad, flat avenues for tanks to go rolling through. The population density is nothing most Americans can imagine, the streets narrow, winding, and very steep in places (what most people think of as Hong Kong is like Manhattan on a mountain).

I lived there in 1997, during the Handover. Up to that point, many were leaving for Canada, fearful of what life under a totalitarian Chinese government would be like. Yet for the millions that live there, Hong Kong is their home. They don’t want to leave and they don’t want what they sense is the influence of the mainland government to grow any stronger. As my friend told me, her grandfather has related why he angrily left China for Hong Kong. This struggle is not just a young persons struggle. It is multi-generational.

It’s a rock-and-hard place scenario and I’m fearful of what might happen. For all I know, the unknown little boy I photographed at the rally 25 years ago is now one of the leaders of the democracy movement. Whatever, I hope he, my friends there, and all the people of Hong Kong can somehow find a peaceful resolution to this struggle.e thing I can see in the videos though, is that while these demonstrators have the most peaceful of intentions, they are not about to stand there, be mowed down & “disappeared.” They are incredibly aware, strategic, organized and they are not easily intimidated. They are very prepared to fight back, and do. Also, Hong Kong is to Beijing like night is to day. There are not the broad, flat avenues for tanks to go rolling through. The population density is nothing most Americans can imagine, the streets narrow, winding, and very steep in places (what most people think of as Hong Kong is like Manhattan on a mountain).

I lived there in 1997, during the Handover. Up to that point, many were leaving for Canada, fearful of what life under a totalitarian Chinese government would be like. Yet for the millions that live there, Hong Kong is their home. They don’t want to leave and they don’t want what they sense is the influence of the mainland government to grow any stronger. As my friend told me, her grandfather has related why he angrily left China for Hong Kong. This struggle is not just a young persons struggle. It is multi-generational.

It’s a rock-and-hard place scenario and I’m fearful of what might happen. For all I know, the unknown little boy I photographed at the rally 25 years ago is now one of the leaders of the democracy movement. Whatever, I hope he, my friends there, and all the people of Hong Kong can somehow find a peaceful resolution to this struggle. They are a reminder of the reasons to be extremelhy grateful for where I am right now. And why we must all keep an eye out.

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Ric Kallaher

Ric is: • a Professional Portrait Photographer specializing in working with small business owners towards enhancing their B2B online goals via executive portraits as well as images that tell the story of a business with on-site photography of facilities &/or product photography ; • an experienced Events Photographer who spectacularly documents high end awards shows and high-society special events, especially in regard to the People of Advertising, Media, Arts and Culture. • an insightful image-maker with a detailed eye who helps interior designers bring their work to life. • an award-winning wedding photographer who helps couples document their special day. Ric's Photographic Mission: To artfully create strong, provocative & transcendent visual records of meaningful relationships & significant moments. Additionally, Ric is a trained actor and experienced music producer who has often been heard applying his voice over talents to ongoing advertising campaigns. He has been the voice on national campaigns for the likes of SuperValu Grocery Stores, Texaco, Kendall Motor Oil, Campbell's Soups and more. He has even appeared ON-camera in an ad for Comedy Central as a scream therapist. His is represented by Ann Wright Reps.

Ric's Really Big Show

Ric's Really Big Show

Having been a stage actor; having written & produced a couple of award-winning tracks of ad music; still working as a voice-over; and more often being mistaken for a musician than a photographer, Ric knows his way around life both backstage and onstage. From a photographic standpoint, he watches and waits for that cathartic moment when performer and performance are one.

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The Endless End - Montauk Life

Montauk

Happy Weekend Update: Finally, it’s Friday. It being the first one in August, accordingly, it’s super-crowded here in Montauk but there’s a good reason for that. This year we are experiencing a glorious season that is providing ample and welcome respite from the many current woes of the world. My jaunt last Sunday out to George’s Lighthouse Cafe to hear my friends @lynnblueband encapsulated this. Montauk Music gleefully entertained Montauk People (whether residents or visitors, whether young or old, or somewhere in between) under the protective presence of the Montauk Lighthouse as Montauk Surfed’n’Rolled below. I wish everyone could get a taste of this. There are many challenges ahead for all so let’s enjoy the good times when and wherever we can. Respectfully and responsibly, of course, but: Keep rockin’!

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Ric Kallaher

Ric is: • a Professional Portrait Photographer specializing in working with small business owners towards enhancing their B2B online goals via executive portraits as well as images that tell the story of a business with on-site photography of facilities &/or product photography ; • an experienced Events Photographer who spectacularly documents high end awards shows and high-society special events, especially in regard to the People of Advertising, Media, Arts and Culture. • an insightful image-maker with a detailed eye who helps interior designers bring their work to life. • an award-winning wedding photographer who helps couples document their special day. Ric's Photographic Mission: To artfully create strong, provocative & transcendent visual records of meaningful relationships & significant moments. Additionally, Ric is a trained actor and experienced music producer who has often been heard applying his voice over talents to ongoing advertising campaigns. He has been the voice on national campaigns for the likes of SuperValu Grocery Stores, Texaco, Kendall Motor Oil, Campbell's Soups and more. He has even appeared ON-camera in an ad for Comedy Central as a scream therapist. His is represented by Ann Wright Reps.

A DAY IN THE LIFE

On the Beach 2

On the Beach

I Read the News . . .

4th of July, a beautiful morning so to beat the crowds I traveled down to the beach EARLY. Not surprisingly, I quickly fell asleep to the lulling sound of the quiet waves. When I woke up a fog bank had rolled in - not unusual for Montauk -- but, still, I was surprised that no one was there. Then again this fog was thicker than I’d ever seen it. Someone was somewhere though because I could hear “Day in the Life” playing in the distance. . . . John Lennon singing, “I read the news today . . . “

I decided to stretch the legs and headed west along the beach at waters edge. A short distance down ahead of me the gray of the fog was turning very dark. Then, black. Gradually, I realized the shadow of a shape — a very large shape was creating almost a black hole in the space in front of me. As I walked closer, I realized, it was a massive object. My heart began racing as at this point the wind picked up and began pushing the fog offshore. I realized how high this thing towered over me and my stomach curdled as I imagined the possibility of it rolling over and crushing me. There were slow, deep-hollow metallic echoes. The surreal notion c that I was at the base of a grounded ship’s prow. I looked up and shuddered.

And THEN, I really woke up. I’d parked my beach chair too close to the waterline so as the tide was coming in it was running up onto my dangling feet. Some junk wood flotsam had washed up beside me. When I turned panel over, this was what I saw.

On the Beach 2
Slave Ship - On the Beach

Oh boy.

Montauk - In the Hat Cave

Another piece by kallaher+smith

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Ric Kallaher

Ric is: • a Professional Portrait Photographer specializing in working with small business owners towards enhancing their B2B online goals via executive portraits as well as images that tell the story of a business with on-site photography of facilities &/or product photography ; • an experienced Events Photographer who spectacularly documents high end awards shows and high-society special events, especially in regard to the People of Advertising, Media, Arts and Culture. • an insightful image-maker with a detailed eye who helps interior designers bring their work to life. • an award-winning wedding photographer who helps couples document their special day. Ric's Photographic Mission: To artfully create strong, provocative & transcendent visual records of meaningful relationships & significant moments. Additionally, Ric is a trained actor and experienced music producer who has often been heard applying his voice over talents to ongoing advertising campaigns. He has been the voice on national campaigns for the likes of SuperValu Grocery Stores, Texaco, Kendall Motor Oil, Campbell's Soups and more. He has even appeared ON-camera in an ad for Comedy Central as a scream therapist. His is represented by Ann Wright Reps.

Sex, Death & Photography

Montauk - In the Hat Cave

Wednesday, June 26 was 'Drop-Off Day’ at New York City’s storied Soho Photo Gallery for their upcoming National Competition Show. This is exciting for me as I had a very exciting reason to be there. The long distance introduction to a distant relative of mine, R. A. Smith of Tchula, MS, about two years ago has profoundly impacted my work. We began a collaboration that has explored the more artistic side of making images and has gone beyond the realms of straight photography. A couple of months ago, we gathered up a ‘what the heck’ attitude and added on one of our joint pieces to a submission I was making to the juried SoHo Photo Gallery show. It was that piece, our maiden submission, that was accepted. It’s a mixed media ‘construction’ entitled "Camera Obscura/Lucida (Barthes)" that is the first of a series based on interpretations of French philosopher Roland Barthes’ small but important book “Camera Lucida - Reflections on Photography”. . The opening reception is Tuesday, July 2, 6-8pm & while R.A. can’t make it up from MS, I’m really looking forward to being there.
https://www.sohophoto.com/

Montauk - In the Hat Cave
Montauk - In the Hat Cave
Montauk - In the Hat Cave
Montauk - In the Hat Cave
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Ric Kallaher

Ric is: • a Professional Portrait Photographer specializing in working with small business owners towards enhancing their B2B online goals via executive portraits as well as images that tell the story of a business with on-site photography of facilities &/or product photography ; • an experienced Events Photographer who spectacularly documents high end awards shows and high-society special events, especially in regard to the People of Advertising, Media, Arts and Culture. • an insightful image-maker with a detailed eye who helps interior designers bring their work to life. • an award-winning wedding photographer who helps couples document their special day. Ric's Photographic Mission: To artfully create strong, provocative & transcendent visual records of meaningful relationships & significant moments. Additionally, Ric is a trained actor and experienced music producer who has often been heard applying his voice over talents to ongoing advertising campaigns. He has been the voice on national campaigns for the likes of SuperValu Grocery Stores, Texaco, Kendall Motor Oil, Campbell's Soups and more. He has even appeared ON-camera in an ad for Comedy Central as a scream therapist. His is represented by Ann Wright Reps.

on The Flatiron Building

The great Beat poet, Gary Snyder, recently was quoted saying, “Like most writers, I don’t educate myself sequentially, but more like a hawk or eagle always circling and finding things that might have been overlooked.” It’s the perfect metaphor for my story,

“Upon Reflection: TIME AND THE HISTORY OF MY OBSESSION”

The Flatiron, Blue & Gold

I can almost remember the sensation of my eyes enlarging at the sight. Long ago, flipping through an issue of LIFE magazine I turned to a full-page color image of some moody and mysterious New York building. It was not the Empire State which usually was what represented the metropolis back then. No story accompanied the picture. It was just the image (one of the things I loved about LIFE) and a caption. That was my introduction to the Flatiron Building. Like so many, I became its captive.

The photograph was made in 1904 by Edward Steichen, a great early pioneer of photographic art, portraying the building, which had only been completed two years prior, in anything but a documentary fashion. I ripped that page from the magazine. And I still have it. Long afterwards, I learned that the image’s color was added to a traditional B&W platinum print by Steichen via a chemical process (of which there are only two variants). His original prints remain iconic examples of the photography’s power and reside in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

When, decades later, I accidentally moved to New York I sought out The Flatiron as if on some romantic pilgrimage, or a quest to locate the holy grail. At that point in history, with the area no longer the posh corner of Manhattan that it had been during the glory days of the Progressive Era, the building was a bit dingy and in a somewhat decrepit state. Yet the architectural design still maintained its singular, grand and iconic presence.

My sense of it came of course complete with the romantic notions dispersed through decades of chamber-of-commerce-esque versions of history. That history was rose-colored to say the least. “Great men doing great things building a great country.”

The Flatiron is generally considered the first skyscraper given that it’s design and construction were made possible by the recent invention of the modern elevator. It anchored the southwest corner of Madison Square Park. (This was at first confusing to a “Memphis boy” like me as the “Madison Square Garden” I grew up with watching tv or reading the sports pages and located far uptown was but the antecedent of not one but two predecessors that had held court cater-cornered from the Flatiron on the Park.) Only a few blocks up Madison Ave had lived J.P. Morgan while a few blocks down Broadway on 20th St. had been the home where Teddy Roosevelt was born. A few blocks further still below was Union Square. The sense of historical magnificence is sustained by how so little, from an architectural standpoint, has changed around Madison Square.

Looking to inform my own developing eye for photography, where else would I go for inspiration than the scene of that Steichen “Pictorialist” image I had seen as a young man? Like many a young photographer, I was hoping to recreate an inspiring composition. But carriages with drivers in top hats having been replaced by modern buses and taxicabs didn’t quite connote the vision I was looking to define. And I also realized that the trees and the bare limbs were key elements to the photograph. I learned this upon finding that they were no longer there. And so I walked around the area “location scouting” for my own compositions which, ultimately, was my goal. This is how I discovered the juxtapositions of the flag and clock on what had once been the famous Fifth Avenue Hotel as well as “heroic” statue on the north end of the Park. That statue actually had been placed before the Flatiron was built and was executed by the famous sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens with a base created by the notorious architect Stanford White.

These discoveries of course led to other less heroic lessons about New York and its “great men.” But that’s a different story. Meanwhile, even 30 years after my first Flatiron exposure, with once again it being a major attraction and the neighborhood back to posh, it still remains for me and now seemingly everyone else, a fascination. Indeed, I still cannot pass without acknowledging it, if only for a silent reverie. I will pause to observe the goings-on that swirl around it like the hat-detaching wind vortex its construction created and which led to the expression “23 Skidoo”. I recently counted no less than 50 people on one single corner, cameras & cellphones pointed skyward clicking away as they tried to get their Flatiron.

When I made my images behind the statue of Farragut, with him seeming to gaze upon the building and realizing he had been a naval officer, I imagined the Flatiron as a great ship, sailing silkily up Broadway. With now my own gaze upon it having lasted decades, long enough to see much that has come and gone in the passage of the light hours, it seems like the Flatiron indeed is a ship of time sailing silently through the course of history. And so, as with Gary Snyder, I continue circling back, fascinated and intrigued as ever, still looking for what image(s) I may have overlooked as it skittered by me in the gusts of my awe.

Flatiron, Now and Then with Berenice Abbot

If you or someone you know would like your very own copy of one of my images (hint hint-they make great gifts), you can order them by going up to the menu & looking under “Hat Tricks For Sale” or just by clicking HERE.

Postscript: a shout out to @austinkleon & his ever-entertaining, ever-inspiring newsletter for bringing the Gary Snyder quote to my attention.

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Ric Kallaher

Ric is: • a Professional Portrait Photographer specializing in working with small business owners towards enhancing their B2B online goals via executive portraits as well as images that tell the story of a business with on-site photography of facilities &/or product photography ; • an experienced Events Photographer who spectacularly documents high end awards shows and high-society special events, especially in regard to the People of Advertising, Media, Arts and Culture. • an insightful image-maker with a detailed eye who helps interior designers bring their work to life. • an award-winning wedding photographer who helps couples document their special day. Ric's Photographic Mission: To artfully create strong, provocative & transcendent visual records of meaningful relationships & significant moments. Additionally, Ric is a trained actor and experienced music producer who has often been heard applying his voice over talents to ongoing advertising campaigns. He has been the voice on national campaigns for the likes of SuperValu Grocery Stores, Texaco, Kendall Motor Oil, Campbell's Soups and more. He has even appeared ON-camera in an ad for Comedy Central as a scream therapist. His is represented by Ann Wright Reps.

Where Did the TIME Go?

In the #maproom employing the Sandometer to explore the infinite mystery.

In the #maproom employing the Sandometer to explore the infinite mystery.

March 1, 2019 — an opportunity to take stock and note that the #1 item on my list of New Year’s resolutions — to commit to a project of photographing every day until the end of January (entitled #maproom) — resulted in being so inspiring that I doubled my return. Alas, originally inspired as I was by the brilliance of the light that streams in during the early Winter it is time to face the reality that, as it does every year, the sun has moved on.

The good news is that, after over 2,600 images made, I have over 100 selects — explorations in close-up tabletop photography while using existing (i.e., constantly shifting light) and coming up with compositions and/or word ideas on the fly can prove quite the challenge.

Yet, while there always will be something going on in the Map Room, the time for the next photo project has come. Fortunately, ideas are already formulating. If nothing else ONE assignment is obvious: to compile the selected images into a book/calendar/set of prints, etc, which will include, enticement/enticement, a few images not yet posted. Therefore, I humbly implore you to stay tuned.

You can best see the latest work by scrolling through my page on Instagram @rickallaher.

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Ric Kallaher

Ric is: • a Professional Portrait Photographer specializing in working with small business owners towards enhancing their B2B online goals via executive portraits as well as images that tell the story of a business with on-site photography of facilities &/or product photography ; • an experienced Events Photographer who spectacularly documents high end awards shows and high-society special events, especially in regard to the People of Advertising, Media, Arts and Culture. • an insightful image-maker with a detailed eye who helps interior designers bring their work to life. • an award-winning wedding photographer who helps couples document their special day. Ric's Photographic Mission: To artfully create strong, provocative & transcendent visual records of meaningful relationships & significant moments. Additionally, Ric is a trained actor and experienced music producer who has often been heard applying his voice over talents to ongoing advertising campaigns. He has been the voice on national campaigns for the likes of SuperValu Grocery Stores, Texaco, Kendall Motor Oil, Campbell's Soups and more. He has even appeared ON-camera in an ad for Comedy Central as a scream therapist. His is represented by Ann Wright Reps.

Sad Passage - Bruno Ganz

Hat Cave Art
Hat Cave Art

From days gone by when one could collect movie posters without it costing an arm and a leg, I managed to purchase a few. They all met two qualifying factors: a) I had to have really thought highly of the film and, b) the posters had to have intriguing artwork. I still have five of the posters, four of them full-size. Two of the five were movies starring Bruno Ganz and, sadly, he passed away this past week. What I always liked him was that he had a great on-screen presence yet he was very understated. I think the first one I saw him in was the great Werner Herzog’s NOSFERATU THE VAMPYRE (1979). I saw this film because, like so many, I was captivated by the work of the wonderfully bizarre, charismatic Klaus Kinski who portrayed Nosferatu and who Herzog had a notoriously near-murderous director/actor relationship with. Ganz played Jonathan Harker and while he wasn’t the centerpiece, he was central. As German filmmakers were very cutting edge in those days, another director I heard about was Wim Wenders. His work attracted me due to his interest in the great American director Nicholas Ray (Ray directed James Dean in REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE but if you want to see a TRUE strange classic it’s his underrated and overlooked JOHNNY GUITAR that you need to check out.) Even as Ray was suffering the effects of the cancer that killed him, the young Wenders went to New York to include him in a film that starred Dennis Hopper and was the first Ripley-charactered film I ever remember hearing of ‘THE AMERICAN FRIEND’. It co-starred, who else?: Bruno Ganz and happily I grabbed a French version of the big one sheet.

That was a time in New York where there were real movie houses that catered to a variety of distinct tastes — and in that era there really were distinctions. I loved these films. Such different perspectives on filmmaking from what we were spoon fed in America. Wenders and especially Herzog (who never seems to stop moving) are still turning out great work. But it was Wenders, who worked with Sam Shepard to make the great PARIS TEXAS with the late Harry Dean Stanton and Kinski’s daughter Natassia as well as the same AMERICAN FRIEND cinematographer, Robby Muller, who would go on to make one of my all-time favorite films: WINGS OF DESIRE. Ganz starred in this incredible black’n’white, surrealistic, spiritual film set in Berlin about a guardian angel who comforts dying people even as he longs to become human himself. It is a classic that tops the list of many a critic as one of the greatest films of all time.

Unfortunately, movie poster prices had increased too much by the time I saw this one & I never snagged one of those. I regret that, because it would a beautiful addition to my little collection. But I still have Bruno’s here. Even if he’s now gone from human to angel.

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Ric Kallaher

Ric is: • a Professional Portrait Photographer specializing in working with small business owners towards enhancing their B2B online goals via executive portraits as well as images that tell the story of a business with on-site photography of facilities &/or product photography ; • an experienced Events Photographer who spectacularly documents high end awards shows and high-society special events, especially in regard to the People of Advertising, Media, Arts and Culture. • an insightful image-maker with a detailed eye who helps interior designers bring their work to life. • an award-winning wedding photographer who helps couples document their special day. Ric's Photographic Mission: To artfully create strong, provocative & transcendent visual records of meaningful relationships & significant moments. Additionally, Ric is a trained actor and experienced music producer who has often been heard applying his voice over talents to ongoing advertising campaigns. He has been the voice on national campaigns for the likes of SuperValu Grocery Stores, Texaco, Kendall Motor Oil, Campbell's Soups and more. He has even appeared ON-camera in an ad for Comedy Central as a scream therapist. His is represented by Ann Wright Reps.

A Moment for Light Reflection

Adventures In the Map Room

The power and potential of memory is on full display in Alfonso Cuaron’s current film ROMA — my personal choice for Best Film this year. Perhaps it was finally having the opportunity to see that film this week that led me today in the #maproom towards some Light Reflection.

Reflecting is also a path to understanding, acknowledging, learning from and adapting those influences that have been encountered along the way into one’s own work. Certainly reading the review in yesterday’s NYTimes regarding the upcoming Frida Kahlo exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum took me back further to something I’d learned from the outstanding 2002 film FRIDA directed by Julie Taymor with a brilliant performance by Salma Hayek about the trailblazing artist: rather than be overcome by circumstances, she conquered them by such acts as treating her plaster torso corsets (necessary after a near-fatal bus crash) as canvases for beautiful art. This along with studying the work of Jean-Michel Basquiat taught me this: anything and EVERYthing can be a canvas. This approach has been influencing my process and approach in my recent personal projects, especially the collaborative work with my distant relative from Mississippi, who I’ve yet to even physically meet, R. A. Smith (more on R. A. at a later time).

A nod must also be made to the influence of a little book I read, STEAL LIKE AN ARTIST, by the ever interesting Austin Kleon

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Ric Kallaher

Ric is: • a Professional Portrait Photographer specializing in working with small business owners towards enhancing their B2B online goals via executive portraits as well as images that tell the story of a business with on-site photography of facilities &/or product photography ; • an experienced Events Photographer who spectacularly documents high end awards shows and high-society special events, especially in regard to the People of Advertising, Media, Arts and Culture. • an insightful image-maker with a detailed eye who helps interior designers bring their work to life. • an award-winning wedding photographer who helps couples document their special day. Ric's Photographic Mission: To artfully create strong, provocative & transcendent visual records of meaningful relationships & significant moments. Additionally, Ric is a trained actor and experienced music producer who has often been heard applying his voice over talents to ongoing advertising campaigns. He has been the voice on national campaigns for the likes of SuperValu Grocery Stores, Texaco, Kendall Motor Oil, Campbell's Soups and more. He has even appeared ON-camera in an ad for Comedy Central as a scream therapist. His is represented by Ann Wright Reps.